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Posts Tagged ‘Ireland’

I haven’t even left California yet and I’ve already screwed up. Awesome.

Checked my e-tickets two days ago and discovered that for reasons lost to the mists of post-menopausal memory, I booked us on a 7am flight out of San Francisco.

Which means we need to get to the airport no later than 5am. Crap.

Much furious consultation with my spouse ensued. We decided to get a motel room at a place near the airport that offers free shuttle service, plus a well-lit place to park a car for the 10 days we’ll be gone.

Of course the problem isn’t confined to the California end of the trip. We arrive in Dublin at 6:55am. Which means that we’ve got ~9 hours to kill before our room in Dublin City Centre opens up.

I can’t manage sightseeing after a transcontinental+transatlantic flight. My body absolutely will not tolerate that kind of nonsense.

The answer is yet another airport motel room. I emailed customer service at the Radisson Blu Dublin Airport and discovered that they’re set up to deal with situations like this in a couple of ways. They’ve got what they call Day Rooms that are available from 9am-5pm, or they’ll let a weary traveler rent a room overnight and check in very late (like, say, early the following morning), then check out at 3pm for no extra charge.

I went with option B, which will allow me to stagger/roll out of Customs and Passport Control straight to the free shuttle, straight to my motel room to collapse in an insensible heap.

While I haven’t yet stayed in their motel, so far I’m quite happy with the Radisson Blu customer service folks. They’ve followed up with me and seem intent on making sure I’m taken care of.

The morals of this story:

1. Pay attention to your flight bookings, and try to make your departure and arrival times work for you rather than against you.

2. Flexibility and good problem-solving skills are key for traveling with pain. Be willing to change your plans to make yourself more comfortable.

3. Money helps. A lot.

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Next week I’m off to Ireland. I’ve never been to Ireland before, so everything will be new and different and shiny.

Here’s how I’ve planned around my pain so far.

Flying out

I’ll do all the right stuff to make the long flight more tolerable, including:

  • Get to the airport ~3 hours before my flight leaves.
  • Use the wheelchair service
  • Bring my own food
  • Bring my neck pillow
  • Do in-seat stretching exercises
  • Get up every hour and walk the length of the cabin and back at least once
  • Stay hydrated
  • Relax when disembarking–the prize for the “race” to the baggage carousel is to wait 20-30 minutes for the luggage to appear, and I don’t want to win that prize

Hotels

All my hotel rooms are booked. Because I’m traveling on my parents’ budget rather than my own, they are nice hotels. Which means working elevators, other people carrying the bags, soft comfy beds, bathtubs, and room service. It’s not politically correct to say so, but rubbing money on the pain really does help.

On the ground transport

In Dublin, we’ll be walking and taking public transit. Because it’s a big touristy city, I know I can catch cabs if I need them. I also know that if I’m having an iffy day, I won’t stray too far from the hotel.

We’re hiring a car and driver for the longer hauls and our time out beyond Dublin. The ‘cars’ will actually be minivans, which means I’ll have a place to lie down if I need it.

Meds

I’ll be refilling all my prescriptions before I leave. None of my current meds are restricted in the EU. All meds will still be in my carry-on, in their original (labeled) bottles.

Ireland is a civilized country that sells codeine-based painkillers over the counter in pharmacies. I will likely take advantage of said civility.

Money

I’ll be getting in touch with my bank early next week to inform them of the trip. These days, you want to do that, so they don’t suspend your account (for suspected fraud) when you suddenly start making charges in another country.

Yup, that’s a lot of planning. But every practical thing I take care of at home makes it easier for me to relax and enjoy

 

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